Affordable Care Act Survives (Again)

affordable_care_act

The U.S. Supreme Court has spoken on the highly anticipated King v. Burwell case.  Subsidies are legal in all 50 states, rather than only in the states with their own insurance exchanges.  The political debate continues and the Justices will receive criticism/praise (depending on one’s personal viewpoint) for having upheld the universal subsidies implementation of the ACA law.  This ruling seems to contradict the plain language of the law and the evidence that the language was intentionally written as it was to coerce the states into setting up exchanges.

Ironically, the Supreme Court found in 2012 that the federal government could not coerce the States into expanding their Medicaid programs under the ACA.  I can’t help but wonder if that specific ruling played into the Court’s ruling on King v. Burwell.  Stay with me… If the court had found that the plain meaning of the ACA language and the evidence (as provided by Gruber) suggested that subsidies were limited only to States setting up their own exchanges, then the Court would have to say that the federal government was once again attempting to coerce the States.  And since it already ruled once that the federal government could not coerce the States on Medicaid expansion, would it not then have to say that the subsidy/exchange coercion is also illegal and thereby throw out the subsidies entirely… in all 50 states regardless of exchanges?

If you follow and buy into my logic, then the Supreme Court Justices (most notably Chief Justice Roberts and swing vote Kennedy) were choosing between upholding the imperfect law as is, or a significant rebuke of the ACA’s subsidy system that would have left them with a glaring inconsistency with their 2012 ruling on Medicaid expansion, or a complete destruction of the ACA law by revoking all subsidies.  Given those choices, I’m not surprised that Roberts and Kennedy chose the first option.  The SCOTUS is not supposed to be political or partisan, but they are human.  I don’t believe that Roberts and Kennedy were comfortable with any of the choices other than upholding the subsidies, despite the statutory language and clear intent of the law’s architects.

Another effect of this ruling could be a further centralization of the U.S. health care system at the federal government level – an outcome that is likely fine with the Obama administration’s single-payer acolytes.  The New York Times suggested that the ruling removes a primary reason for States to establish and operate health care insurance exchanges, so many States may just let the Feds takeover the entire process.  Another bit of irony since that reasoning further supports the notion that the law’s intention was indeed to condition subsidies on State-run exchanges.

The political battle over the ACA will continue for years to come.  For now though, the significant legal challenges that might upend the law seem to be exhausted.  From an insurance perspective, it seems to me that it’s time we all accept the ACA as settled law, for good or for bad, and figure out how to best live with it.  And if you happen to believe that the law includes provisions supporting “death panels” then this may be easier said than done.

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One thought on “Affordable Care Act Survives (Again)

  1. Pingback: ACA Legal Challenge, Part 3 | Ferris State Risk Management and Insurance Academics

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